Changing the tides of sustainability.

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Our Lead Copywriter, Ben, talks about doing his small bit for the planet after a quick clean up of his local beach...

Last weekend I joined The Million Mile Clean in a nationwide beach clean. I say beach, but this campaign includes rivers and waterways too. 100,000 volunteers are currently working together to clean up one million miles of UK coastline. Organisers have worked out if 100,000 volunteers cover 10 miles each during the year, that’s a cool million miles. Ambitious, but doable.

The effort has been brought about by the S.A.S. (Surfers Against Sewage), who do fantastic work for the planet. My son and I joined lots of families and fellow helpers up, down and around the coast. Joining a group just west of Brighton, we filled a couple of large refuse sacks to the brim, with mainly plastic pollutants.

By the end of the morning, all the trash was gathered, weighed, registered and then disposed of by the fantastic S.A.S. reps, who were up and at ‘em early with the rubber gloves and cleaning apparatus. We’re all guilty of ‘throwing away’ plastic, but sadly, if it’s not recyclable, there is no ‘away’. It tends to hang around. And sooner or later, it’ll find its way to the sea.

Beach cleans are a great way to engage the next generation around all things sustainable. They’re important in improving our coastal ecosystems, preventing harmful or toxic materials impacting marine wildlife. And us. They also rank pretty high on the feel-good factor!

The ocean covers over 70% of the Earth's surface and contains 97% of the Earth's water(1).
The amount of plastic waste that flows into our oceans is projected to triple by 2040 to 29 million metric tonnes which is a worrying statistic(2). That’s why it’s so important to do our bit for the planet, like Ben. Little steps!

(1)https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oceanwater.html
(2) https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...f-nothing-done